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In an effort to fight antisemitism....



Insidious Evil Revisited: A Historical Analysis of Antisemitism


Throughout the spring, Temple Beth Israel will offer a weekly course, outlining a historical analysis of antisemitism. These informal workshops are designed to educate, generate discussion, and learn more about literature and academic scholarship on the various periods of antisemitism. While literature and follow-up material will be referenced, absolutely no prior knowledge or in-depth expertise are required to learn and participate in our discussions. All are welcomed!!


Please pay close attention to the dates and starting times. The aspiration is that we will start at 7pm and generally be finished by 8:30pm. These sessions should be available both online and in-person. Sessions will be hosted at Temple Beth Israel with light refreshments served.


Class 1: Jews, Judaism, Anti-Judaism, and Antisemitism; Wed. April 19th 7-8:30pm


Class 2: Anti-Judaism in Antiquity and Early Christianity; Thurs. April 27th 7-8:30pm


Class 3: Anti-Judaism in the Dark Ages and Early Modern Period; Wed. May 3rd 7-8:30pm


Class 4: Antisemitism in the Modern Period; Wed. May 10th 7-8:30pm


Class 5: Antisemitism in the years surrounding the Shoah/Holocaust; Wed. May 17th 7-9pm


Class 6: Antisemitism in American History; Tues. May 23rd- 7-8:30pm


Class 7: Israel, Anti-Zionism, and New vs. Old Antisemitism; Wed. May 31st 7-9pm

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