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Catching up....

Shalom TBI and Greater Plattsburgh,

As we quickly approach the halfway point of December with Chanukah arriving Sunday, Dec. 18th at sundown, this is a perfect time to reflect on the last few months.


On Sunday, Oct. 9th, TBI celebrated the holiday of Sukkot, by building none other than a Sukkah.

Later in the evening, we waved the festive lulav and etrog and enjoyed some of the seven species of Israel: wheat, barley, figs, grapes, pomegranates, dates, and olives.


On October 25th, in honor of Parsha Noach (Noah’s Ark portion in the Torah), we visited the Elmore SPCA and met some new friends, who also need a loving home.

If you’re interested in learning more about the Elmore SPCA in Peru, NY or in volunteering opportunities; perhaps spend some quality cuddle time with the kittens, take the dogs for a good run, make a charitable donation, or donate pet supplies, then visit their website: https://www.elmorespca.org/ As a no-kill shelter, the Elmore SPCA does not receive state funding. So, please consider making an end of the year contribution to an organization that provides so much to our community.


On Sunday, Nov. 11th, over 20 members of the TBI community visited Ohavi Zedek in Burlington, VT for the Fall Northern Nosh. We meet Jews from all over Vermont, ate some yummy delicacies (blintzes, rugalach, Israeli salad), and were treated to an absolute piece of Judaic art marvel; the Lost Mural Project: https://www.lostmural.org/




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